Posts Tagged ‘jornalismo do cidadão

05
Jun
09

Demotix signs with the Telegraph | Demotix é integrado no Telegraph

Demotix @ Telegraph

Demotix @ Telegraph

Demotix, the citizen-journalism website has signed with the Telegraph. Now their widget is available in the International  News page of the Telegraph’s website. This is a major breakthrough for the project, since its their major subscription in the UK. They sent out a press release i’m sharing with you below.

Demotix, o site de jornalismo do cidadão assinou com o Telegraph. Agora a sua widget está visível na página de notícias internacionais do site do jornal. Este é um avanço importante para o projecto, já que é a maior subscrição no Reino Unido. Eles enviaram um press release, que podem ler abaixo.

Demotix CEO, Turi Munthe, said: “For Demotix, this is really exciting. The Telegraph was our very earliest supporter, and immediately understood what we were trying to achieve. As for our contributors, the chance to get their stories out to so many people in the UK, US, Canada and elsewhere is fantastic. Demotix was founded to give a loudspeaker to the man and woman on the street. With this partnership, their voices just got louder.”

Justin Williams, Assistant Editor, The Daily Telegraph, said: “We’re delighted to showcase Demotix’s amazing images to telegraph.co.uk’s global audience. The Telegraph was the first UK media organisation to spot the immense potential of Demotix and its global network of correspondents and we’re looking forward to continuing the partnership as this innovative project continues to grow in size and influence.”

Continue a ler ‘Demotix signs with the Telegraph | Demotix é integrado no Telegraph’

04
Fev
09

Top5: Most annoying discussions | Discussões mais irritantes

Citizen Journalism | Jornalismo do Cidadão

http://www.nataliedee.com/123107/ugh-journalistic-integrity-is-BORING.jpg

The shift | A mudança

This one is going to be short and sweet. I have already witten a post about this, and much of the problems that applied earlier in the relationship between bloggers and journalists are easily transferred here, with a few more important details.

Citizen Journalism

The big question: can citizens be journalists? The short answer: yes. The difference is in a set of characteristics that separate the citizen journalism from the freelancer/hired/part time  journalist i defined in a previous post:

  • It’s casual, whoever practices the journalistic act can do it only once in a lifetime.
  • It is mainly spontaneous, not dependant of an incumbency or professional obligation. It can be provoked by opportunity, personal need or social responsibility.
  • It is disorganized/not sistematic – this can happen in more or less degree, specializing in a job implies the learning of a method, that the citizen journalist may or may not master.
  • It is related to the surrounding reality of the citizen journalist, wether it is in a geographical level, emotional, cultural, therefore there is a certain amount of partiality (but like we’ve seen before, impartiality doesn’t not objectively exist in traditional journalism).
  • It doesn’t follow the mainstream news agenda. Apart from calamities, terrorist attacks, or other high profile events, Citizen Journalism tends to reflect realities, subjects, or perspectives absent from the mainstream media coverage.
  • It can be done by people who have a greater specific knowledge about a given subject than a journalist (which happens frequently, one can’t just know about everything).
  • The purpose is not any sort of remuneration but simply the act of information. (this can change)

Still, many don’t believe that a citizen is capable of creating a journalistic piece. I could build a chair and not be a professional carpenter. And it could the most comfortable  reliable ass-sitting piece of furniture ever made, better than a pro would do, or  it could even be a wobbly one, good enough for the fireplace, that it would still be a chair. There is lots of of journalism that is good enough, for that: to burn. The point is, regular people can do it, with more or less skill. They won’t do it often, but i say their participation is important, and their input priceless.

This forced a whole new relationship between the once before isolated media and the passive, yet eager to participate audience. New forms of collaboration and new spaces where only the seasoned pros dwelled were created. Though sometimes it all looks like a joke to me – they reduce citizen journalism to candid camera – there are others who will gladly use citizen participation to create new contents otherwise impossible to make. The audience is shaping the agenda and the creation of contents in more or less subtle ways, sharing info, sending pictures, or just by suggesting new themes or funding stories. In the future, citizens will be actively shaping the journalistic activity in different manners:

-sending data, pictures, via Twitter or directly to the websites or mashups;

-organizing huge amounts of information that one journalist alone couldn’t fathom;

-proposing and/or funding stories;

-by being new distribution channels, sharing the news via social networking (this is a huge growing trend);

-by directly commenting, correcting, or updating the info, making the articles evolve and become more accurate;

-and many other things i’m not even imagining or remembering now, if you have any suggestions leave them in the comments;

Journalists will be organizing this flow of contribution / demand created by the audience (leaving this carefree attitude behind), who is no longer a mere holder of papers and remotes, but an active element of news creation and distribution. Does this makes a citizen a journalist? No, but more like an editor.

But back to the main issue, some argue that whatever a citizen may create it can hardly be considered as journalism, because journalism implies rules, certain objectives bla bla bla…we can also argue then that many journalism, by those standards, isn’t journalism at all.Not a good logic to apply here, nonetheless it is true.

This is not getting as short as i intended to so let me finish it sweet: Citizens can be Journalists (under the features i listed before). Now i’d just love to see some journalists become better citizens.

Este vai ser curto e meigo. Eu já escrevi um post sobre isto, e muitos dos problemas que se aplicaram antes à relação entre bloggers e jornalistas podem ser facilmente transferidas para aqui, com apenas mais uns pormenores importantes.

Jornalismo do Cidadão

A grande pergunta: podem os cidadãos ser jornalistas? A resposta curta: sim. A diferença está num conjunto de características que separam o jornalismo do cidadão do jornalista freelancer/contratado/part-time, que já listei num post anterior:

  • É casual, quem exerce o acto jornalístico pode fazê-lo apenas uma vez na vida.
  • É predominantemente espontâneo, não sujeito a encomenda ou obrigação profissional. Pode ser causado por uma questão de oportunidade, necessidade pessoal ou responsabilidade social.
  • É desorganizado/não sistematizado- aqui pode ser em maior ou menor grau, a especialização numa profissão implica a aprendizagem de um método, que o jornalista-cidadão  pode ou não dominar.
  • Está relacionado com a realidade próxima do jornalista-cidadão, seja a nivel geográfico, emocional, cultural, logo existe um certo grau de parcialidade (mas como já vimos, a imparcialidade não existe  objectivamente no jornalismo tradicional).
  • Está fora da agenda noticiosa tradicional. À excepção de calamidades, atentados, ou outros eventos de grande repercussão, o Jornalismo do Cidadão tem tendência a reflectir realidades, assuntos, ou perspectivas ausentes da cobertura mediática.
  • Pode ser feito por pessoas com mais conhecimento específico sobre um determinado assunto do que um jornalista (que é o que acontece muitas vezes, não se pode saber tudo).
  • O objectivo não é uma remuneração, mas apenas o acto de informar.(isto pode mudar)

Mesmo assim, muitos ainda não acreditam que um cidadão é capaz de criar uma peça jornalística. Eu podia fazer uma cadeira e não ser um carpinteiro de profissão. E até podia ser a mais confortável e estável peça de mobiliário para assentar o rabo jamais feita, melhor do que por um profissional, ou até podia ser uma toda torta, boa apenas para arder na fogueira, que ainda seria uma cadeira. Existe muito jornalismo que é tão bom como isso, para arder. A ideia é que pessoas normais podem fazê-lo, com maior ou menor capacidade. Não o farão muitas vezes, mas eu digo que a sua participação é importante, e o seu contributo valiosíssimo.

Isto impôs uma toda nova relação entre os antes isolados media e o passivo mas desejoso de participar público. Foram criados novas formas de colaboração e novos espaços apenas disponíveis antes para profissionais experientes. Apesar de às vezes me parecer uma enorme piada – eles reduzem o jornalismo do cidadão a uma espécie de “apanhados”- há outros que de bom grado usam a participação dos cidadãos para criar novos conteúdos que de outra forma seriam impossíveis de fazer. O público está a moldar a agenda e a criação de conteúdos de forma mais ou menos subtil, partilhando informação, enviando imagens, ou apenas sugerindo novos temas ou financiando reportagens. No futuro, os cidadãos irão activamente moldar a actividade jornalística de várias formas:

-enviando dados, imagens, via Twitter ou directamente para os sites ou mashups;

-organizando enormes quantidades de informação que um só jornalista não conseguiria tratar;

-propondo e/ou financiando reportagens;

-sendo mais um canal de distribuição, partilhando as ntícias via redes sociais (esta é uma tendência em crescimento);

-comentando, corrigindo ou actualizando a informação directamente, fazendo evoluir os artigos e a torná-los mais correctos;

-e muitas outras coisas que nem imagino ou me lembro agora,se tiverem sugestões deixem nos comentários;

Os jornalistas irão organizar este fluxo de contributos/procura criados pelos utilizadores, (deixando esta ideia despreocupada para trás) que não são mais apenas  suportes de jornais e comandos de televisão, mas um elemento activo na criação e distribuição de notícias. Isto faz deles jornalistas? Não, talvez mais editores.

Mas de volta à questão principal, alguns podem dizer que o que um cidadão cria dificilmente pode ser considerado como jornalismo, porque isso implica regras, certos objectivos, blá blá… também posso argumentar que muito jornalismo, por esses padrões, também não pode ser considerado como tal. Não é uma boa lógica para se aplicar aqui, todavia é verdade.

Isto não está a ficar tão curto como queria, por isso vou terminar meigo: os Cidadãos podem fazer de Jornalistas (dentro das características listadas antes). Agora adorava ver alguns jornalistas ser melhores cidadãos.

READ ALSO ABOUT THE OTHERS | LEIAM TAMBÉM SOBRE AS OUTRAS

The Death of Newspapers | A morte dos Jornais

Bloggers vs Journalists | Bloggers vs Jornalistas

Death of the blogosphere | Morte da Blogosfera

Continue a ler ‘Top5: Most annoying discussions | Discussões mais irritantes’

17
Dez
08

Features of Citizen Journalism | Características do Jornalismo do Cidadão

João Canavilhas vision | A visão de João Canavilhas

João Canavilhas vision on CitJ | Visão de João Canavilhas sobre Jornalismo do Cidadão

During his presentation at the International Cyberjournalism Congress, João Canavilhas used two similar images to the ones above to express his scepticism regarding the existence of a real citizen journalism. I understand his point of view, but totally disagree.

It’s true that the umbrella of what is called “Citizen Journalism” covers a lot that isn’t journalism. But is a picture taken by a professional more valid than any other taken by a mere mortal? Or can’t the factual reporting via Twitter of someone who is experiencing the event be considered as journalism? Lets go step by step.


What is Journalism?

Journalism is the profession of writing or communicating, formally employed by publications and broadcasters, for the benefit of a particular community of people. The writer or journalist is expected to use facts to describe events, ideas, or issues that are relevant to the public. Journalists (also known as news analysts, reporters, and correspondents) gather information, and broadcast it so we remain informed about local, state, national, and international events. They can also present their points of view on current issues and report on the actions of the government, public officials, corporate executives, interest groups, media houses, and those who hold social power or authority. Journalism is described as The Fourth Estate.

Wikipedia

For  starters, and from this point of view, there are lots of things considered as journalism that couldn’t be. But that is not the subject of today. What has always scared the Citizen Journalism slanderers was the possible lack of quality and impartiality of the journalistic reports submitted by the non-professional. This coming from an industry that has been making a living out of the reproduction of press releases. It’s not a matter of education, we have scientists, economists, lawyers etc, practising journalism. It is not a matter of having a contract with a communication company, since many journalists are in precarious situations, or developing their activity on their own. How can we define the features of Citizen Journalism then?

The possibility of a more active participation with the media comes with the technological revolution of democratization of information gathering and distribution devices. Which means, when it became possible to take pictures and write text and publish it on the web in a matter of minutes and without costs. Ever since we could distribute contents to a wider audience without recurring to the traditional channels, Citizen Journalism became possible. And this is just the logistics that allowed the common user to make Citizen Journalism, which doesn’t mean it will, of course. What defines the act of Jornalism by citizens is exactly the same that defines traditional Journalism, but with peculiar characteristics.

Citizen Journalism features

  • It’s casual, whoever practices the journalistic act can do it only once in a lifetime.
  • It is mainly spontaneous, not dependant of an incumbency or professional obligation. It can be provoked by opportunity, personal need or social responsibility.
  • It is disorganized/not sistematic – this can happen in more or less degree, specializing in a job implies the learning of a method, that the citizen journalist may or may not master.
  • It is related to the surrounding reality of the citizen journalist, wether it is in a geographical level, emotional, cultural, therefore there is a certain amount of partiality (but like we’ve seen before, impartiality doesn’t not objectively exist in traditional journalism).
  • It doesn’t follow the mainstream news agenda. Apart from calamities, terrorist attacks, or other high profile events, Citizen Journalism tends to reflect realities, subjects, or perspectives absent from the mainstream media coverage.
  • It can be done by people who have a greater specific knowledge about a given subject than a journalist (which happens frequently, one can’t just know about everything).
  • The purpose is not any sort of remuneration but simply the act of information.

Taking these features into account and the volume of already created contents, can we still in good mind deny the existence of a true journalism made by common citizens? I’m not defending that it exists unflawed, nor that it is better than the professionaly (=as a profession) made journalism, but i won’t say either that most of the professional reports is better than some cases of citizen journalism. Journalists are paid professionals, specialists in the gathering, construction and distribution of information, and their role – as long as it is well performed – is inquestionable in this society of communication en masse.

What other features can also define Citizen Journalism? Is it just a subterfuge for media companies to obtain free contents? Does it really exist or not?

Durante a sua apresentação no Congresso Internacional de Jornalismo, João Canavilhas usou duas imagens semelhantes às de cima para mostrar o seu cepticismo relativamente à existência de um jornalismo do cidadão. Eu percebo a perspectiva dele, mas não concordo.

É verdade que se chama “jornalismo do cidadão” a muita coisa que não o é. Mas uma imagem obtida por um profissional sobre um acontecimento que faz notícia é mais válida que outra obtida por um comum mortal? Ou o relato factual via Twitter por quem está a assistir ao acontecimento não pode ser considerado como jornalismo? Vamos por partes.

O que é Jornalismo?

Jornalismo é a profissão de escrever ou comunicar, formalmente usada por publicações e distribuidores de informação, para benefício de uma comunidade específica de pessoas. Do escritor ou jornalista espera-se que use factos para descrever eventos, ideias ou assuntos, que sejam relevantes para o público. Os Jornalistas (também conhecidos por analistas de informação, repórteres ou correspondentes) recolhem informação, e distribuem-na para que possamos estar informados sobre acontecimentos locais, nacionais e internacionais. Eles também podem apresentar os seus pontos de vista em assuntos correntes e informar sobre actividades do Governo, funcionários públicos, executivos empresariais, grupos de interesse, os media, e aqueles que detém poder ou autoridade social. O Jornalismo é descrito como o Quarto Poder.

Traduzido da Wikipedia

Para já, e por este ponto de vista, há muita coisa que é considerada como jornalismo que não o podia ser. Mas o assunto não é esse. O que sempre assustou os detractores do Jornalismo do Cidadão foi a possível falta de qualidade e a parcialidade dos relatos jornalísticos enviados por não-profissionais. Isto vindo de uma indústria que tem vivido da reprodução de press releases. Não é uma questão de formação, temos cientistas, economistas, advogados etc, a fazer jornalismo. Não é uma questão de contrato com uma empresa de comunicação, pois muitos jornalistas profissionais estão em situações precárias ou desenvolvem o seu trabalho por conta própria. Como é que se pode caracterizar então o Jornalismo do Cidadão?

A possibilidade de uma participação mais activa junto dos orgãos de comunicação surge com a revolução tecnológica da democratização de equipamentos de recolha e distribuição de informação. Ou seja, quando se pode tirar fotos e escrever um texto e colocá-los na web no espaço de minutos e sem grandes custos. Assim que se pode distribuir conteúdos para uma grande audiência sem recorrer aos canais tradicionais, surgiu a possibilidade de fazer  Jornalismo do Cidadão. Esta é apenas a  parte logística que permitiu ao utilizador comum fazer jornalismo, o que não quer dizer que o faça, claro. O que define o acto de Jornalismo por cidadãos é exactamente o mesmo que define o Jornalismo tradicional, mas com características particulares.

Características do Jornalismo do Cidadão

  • É casual, quem exerce o acto jornalístico pode fazê-lo apenas uma vez na vida.
  • É predominantemente espontâneo, não sujeito a encomenda ou obrigação profissional. Pode ser causado por uma questão de oportunidade, necessidade pessoal ou responsabilidade social.
  • É desorganizado/não sistematizado- aqui pode ser em maior ou menor grau, a especialização numa profissão implica a aprendizagem de um método, que o jornalista-cidadão  pode ou não dominar.
  • Está relacionado com a realidade próxima do jornalista-cidadão, seja a nivel geográfico, emocional, cultural, logo existe um certo grau de parcialidade (mas como já vimos, a imparcialidade não existe  objectivamente no jornalismo tradicional).
  • Está fora da agenda noticiosa tradicional. À excepção de calamidades, atentados, ou outros eventos de grande repercussão, o Jornalismo do Cidadão tem tendência a reflectir realidades, assuntos, ou perspectivas ausentes da cobertura mediática.
  • Pode ser feito por pessoas com mais conhecimento específico sobre um determinado assunto do que um jornalista (que é o que acontece muitas vezes, não se pode saber tudo).
  • O objectivo não é uma remuneração, mas apenas o acto de informar.

Tendo em conta estas características e  o volume de conteúdos criados, podemos nós continuar a negar a existência de um verdadeiro jornalismo feito por cidadãos comuns? Não defendo que existe sem defeitos, nem que seja melhor do que o jornalismo feito por profissionais, mas também não defendo que muito trabalho profissional é melhor que alguns casos de jornalismo do cidadão. Os jornalistas são profissionais pagos, especialistas na recolha, construção e distribuição de conteúdos e o seu papel – sempre que for bem desempenhado – é inquestionável nesta sociedade de informação em massa.

Que outras características vocês acham que podem definir o Jornalismo do Cidadão? Será apenas uma forma encapotada de obter conteúdos gratuitos por parte das empresas de comunicação? Existe realmente ou não?

Citizen journalism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Citizen journalism, also known as public or participatory journalism or democratic journalism, is the act of non-professionals “playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information,” according to the seminal report We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne Bowman and Chris Willis. They say, “The intent of this participation is to provide independent, reliable, accurate, wide-ranging and relevant information that a democracy requires.” Citizen journalism should not be confused with civic journalism, which is practiced by professional journalists. Citizen journalism is a specific form of citizen media as well as user generated content.

Mark Glasser, a longtime freelance journalist who frequently writes on new media issues, gets to the heart of it:

The idea behind citizen journalism is that people without professional journalism training can use the tools of modern technology and the global distribution of the Internet to create, augment or fact-check media on their own or in collaboration with others. For example, you might write about a city council meeting on your blog or in an online forum. Or you could fact-check a newspaper article from the mainstream media and point out factual errors or bias on your blog. Or you might snap a digital photo of a newsworthy event happening in your town and post it online. Or you might videotape a similar event and post it on a site such as YouTube.

Wikipedia

Continue a ler ‘Features of Citizen Journalism | Características do Jornalismo do Cidadão’

24
Set
08

Os blogs sob fogo | Blogs under fire

http://passionweiss.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/blogger-gang-hand-signs-small.png

Amanhã é discutida no Parlamento Europeu uma proposta que pretende clarificar o “estatuto jurídico das diferentes categorias de autores e editores de blogues, um meio de expressão cada vez mais comum na Internet.

Porquê? “…o seu estatuto jurídico, não está definido nem é indicado aos leitores, o que causa incertezas em relação à imparcialidade, fiabilidade, protecção das fontes, aplicabilidade dos códigos deontológicos e atribuição de responsabilidades em caso de acção judicial.” Ah! Porque os autores dos blogs são pessoas irresponsáveis, e na maior parte dos casos não dizem nada de jeito. Se fosse só nos blogs…

Já hoje no Guardian, Marcel Berlins queixava-se dos problemas que o anonimato na net traz a quem quer fazer um trabalho responsável, e mostra a cara. Aliás, tem sido muito discutida a forma como os jornais moderam os comentários aos seu artigos. Mas , e quando o anonimato é necessário para a protecção  de pessoas que denunciam casos de interesse público?

Do Brasil vem a notícia que o presidente do Sindicato dos Jornalistas do Rio Grande do Sul defende que “blogs informativos têm de ser assinados por jornalistas.” Ora isto porque os jornalistas são mais responsáveis e têm estatuto jurídico, talvez. Nunca se ouviu falar de jornalistas que veicularam notícias falsas e que escaparam impunes.

Jeff Jarvis suspira porque os tiques dos velhos media levam muita gente a queixar-se da falta de qualidade dos blogs, e da falta de ética dos bloggers.  A resposta virá na coluna que ele escreve no Guardian esta semana. E vai ser boa.

Entretanto, aqui fica a minha: meus senhores e senhoras, deixem-se de tretas. O anonimato é uma arma perigosa,é sim senhor, mas também devia ser uma forma de descredibilizar alguns personagens.E não conheço um único jornalista que não tenha trabalhado a partir de uma fonte anónima. Depois, os jornalistas não são obrigatoriamente mais capazes que outros cidadãos para criar conteúdos jornalísticos. O que não falta por aí são jornalistas incompetentes que seguem agendas pessoais, corporativas ou políticas que nada dignificam a profissão.

E quantos jornalistas são antes outra coisa qualquer? Digam-me a percentagem de jornalistas portugueses com Carteira Profissional com um curso ou formação em Jornalismo, a experiência é importante, mas quando é que passaram do que eram antes a jornalistas? Todos os produtores de conteúdos informativos deviam estar abrangidos pela mesma cartilha  e sem ser necessário estarem encartados, porque muitos que ganham a vida como jornalistas não o estão, e não são piores profissionais. Antes de mais existe responsabilidade civil e depois a profissional.

E quanto à criação independente de conteúdos criada por cidadãos, bem ela está aqui e não vai acabar enquanto houver meios para isso. Habituem-se, e esforcem-se por fazer melhor.

Tomorrow the European Parliament will debate a proposal that intends to clarify “their legal status, and to create legal safeguards for use in the event of lawsuits as well as to establish a right to reply.” And why?

“…their legal status is not defined and it’s not clear for their reader, which causes uncertainties regarding impartiality, liability, source protection, applicability of the  deonthological codes and the attribution of responsabilities in cases of legal actions.” Oh! Because blog authors are irresposible people, and most of times don’t say anything good. Were it only in blogs…

Today in The Guardian Marcel Berlin complained about all the troubles that net anonimity brings to those who want to do a responsible job while showing their faces. In fact, there has been a lot of discussion on how newspapers moderate the comments to their articles. But, what happens when anonimity is necessary to protect those who expose situtions of public interest?

From Brazil arrives the story of the president of a journalists union defending that “news blogs must be of the responsibility of journalists”. Yes, because journalists are far more responsible and have lega status , maybe. We never heard of journalists that published fake stories and got away with it, have we?

Jeff Jarvis sighs because the old media habits have led many to complain about the low quality of blogs, and blogger’s lack of ethics. The answer will come in the weekly column he writes  for the Guardian. And i bet it will be good.

Meanwhile, here’s my very own answer: ladies and gentleman, cut the crap. Anonimity is a dangerous weapon, no doubt about it, but it should also be a way to deny credit to  some characters. And i don’t know a single journalist who has based a news story  from an anonymous tip or source. And journalists aren’t compulsorily  more able than other citizens to create journalistic contents. We have our share of incompetent journalists following personal, corporate or political agendas, that make this job look real ugly from society’s point of view.

And how many journalists are something else first? Tell me, how many portuguese journalists with the Professional Card have a degree or a course in Journalism, experience is of utmost importance, when did they stopped being something else to reborn as journalists? All news content generators should be under the same rules, without the need of any kind of certification, because there are many who have been making their lives as good journalists that don’t have it, and they aren’t worse than the others. Before there must be something called civil responsability, and only afterwards the professional responsability.

And what about the independent user generated content, well, it’s here to stay, and it won’t disappear while there are the means to do it. So, suck it up, and try to do better.

Links

Amanhã é um dia importante para a Blogosfera

The web encourages lies and deceit. It’s impossible to know who lurks behind a funny nickname

blogs informativos têm de ser assinados por jornalistas, diz sindicato

Sigh

Continue a ler ‘Os blogs sob fogo | Blogs under fire’

09
Jun
08

A agenda participativa | The participatory agenda

http://blog.provokat.ca/uploads/love_me.jpg

Eles estão aí,nós fazemos parte deles, eles têm o poder, e nós temos que saber lidar com eles. O Dan Schultz escreveu mais um dos seus brilhantes artigos sobre como é que os utilizadores podem participar na agenda noticiosa e como essa participação pode ser gerida. Recomenda-se.

They’re here, we are a part of them, they have the power, and we must know how to deal with it. Dan Schultz wrote another of his brilliant articles on how users can participate in the construction of the news agenda, and how that participation can be managed. Highly recommended.

We all know that the “audience” analogy no longer represents the way journalism should work. We know that the people reading the news have opinions, perspectives, and facts that are relevant to the conversation. Some of them just have observations, but others are reporters at heart or maybe they have the wordsmithing abilities of a columnist.

This post is about how the news system I’ve been blogging about can be driven by user generated content and collective intelligence. In a larger sense, however, it is about the way in which any news organization can make the move past the one-sided “audience” view of things and incorporate the voices and minds of its readers to better serve the public.

A Participatory News Agenda, Dan Schultz

Continue a ler ‘A agenda participativa | The participatory agenda’

17
Mai
08

Como o jornalismo do cidadão transformou o jornalismo| how has citizen journalism transformed journalism

Paul Bradshaw gravou 3 videos a explicar que influência tem o jornalismo do cidadão no jornalismo tradicional. Uma aula grátis e muito interessante.

Paul Bradshaw recorded three videos explaining the influence of citizen journalism in traditional jourrnalism. A free and very interesting class.


how has citizen journalism transformed journalism pt3


how has citizen journalism transformed journalism pt2

Q&A: how has citizen journalism transformed journalism pt2

Continue a ler ‘Como o jornalismo do cidadão transformou o jornalismo| how has citizen journalism transformed journalism’

09
Mai
08

Não é o lucro | It´s not about the profit

BBC citJ

O site holandês Skoeps.nl dedicado baseado em jornalismo do cidadão fechou a semana passada por não se ter tornado lucrativo. Nicolas Kayser-Bril explica as razões num post para o OJB.

O que levanta a questão: o jornalismo do cidadão envolve lucro?

—————————-

The citizen journalism based dutch website Skoeps.nl closed down last week because it didn’t turn out profitable.Nicolas Kayser-Bril tells us why in this OJB post.

Which raises the question: is citizen journalism about the profit?

Skoeps closure: CitJ is not about money

Continue a ler ‘Não é o lucro | It´s not about the profit’




I moved | Mudei-me

140char

Sharks patrol these waters

  • 121,404 nadadores|swimmers
who's online

Add to Technorati Favorites

View my FriendFeed



Twitter

Add to Technorati Favorites Creative Commons License

Naymz | LinkedIn

View Alex Gamela's profile on LinkedIn

View Alex Gamela's page at wiredjournalists.com


Videocast

Top Clicks

  • Nenhum

a

Ouçam o meu podcast AQUI | Listen to my podcast HERE |


My del.icio.us

Use Open Source

LastFM

 

Outubro 2014
S T Q Q S S D
« Out    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Seguir

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.